Monthly Archives: November 2010

Self-similarity in sound

Finally, I have found a sort of self-similarity in sound! Attempting to understand the differences between orchestral composition and electroacoustic composition has revealed a pattern specific to orchestral works. Perlin Noise is randomness at different scales. What I have found … Continue reading

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On timbre

Xenakis is broadly recognised as being one of the most important figures in the development of electronic music. So why is it that out of the 150 works he composed, only a handful are electronic works? (James Harley, “The Electroacoustic … Continue reading

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Does the revelation go beyond the technology?

Is there any revelation, in this clever installation, other than “this is what you can do with technology”? Maybe there is, but it doesn’t seem to come across in the video. I wonder what revelation could be appropriated. Something about … Continue reading

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Gorged

I’ve just completed a composition that I’ve called Gorged. It can be downloaded/listened to here¬†http://soundOfSpace.com I’m not happy with it. Truth be told, there is no compositional intent in it. It is more an exploration of the capabilities of the … Continue reading

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Yeah, but does it sound any good

Having participated in several computer music conferences, it has been bothering me how the majority of work presented is sonically un-interesting. It appears as though the work is not motivated by the resultant sound, but rather by what is possible … Continue reading

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Xenakis and Ligeti, the conception of a composition

A fellow doctoral student, at the UOW, commented that the majority of Xenakis’s music is not beautiful, whereas Ligeti’s music is always beautiful. I asked him to expand. He said he was not convinced that Xenakis had an ‘ear’. He … Continue reading

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What is the relationship between the discovery of a new technique and a work of art?

The below video uses a technique of using vertical ‘scan’ lines, on a semi-random walk across an image, to create an eery distortion of the original image. Its a known technique but used over successive images such as this reveals … Continue reading

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